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Nothing is written in stone

Last week somebody mentioned the idiom ‘written in stone’  in class. The idiomatic expression has a figurative meaning similar to permanent, not subject to change and its origin probably dates back to the days of King Hammurabi of Babylon who had his laws written in stone tablets so that they could not be changed and spoilt. Besides this explanation there is a second in the Exudus according to which God wrote the Ten Commandments into stone with his own finger and Moses brought it down from Mount Sinai.

Also I’ve found a post with a beautiful prompt to see the idiomatic expression in context.

Nothing Is Written In Stone (Prompt from Baron)

We say, “nothing is written in stone”…
Except death.
Death is written in stone;
beloved wife-father-son-daughter.

The sleep of the dead,
under cold marbled stone – death
There it is written in stone

…but…

He who holds the Book Of Life
has the “Key” to release death,
to erase the chiseled words written in stone.

Undoing the eternal sleep,
so it’s true…

“Nothing is Written in Stone”

I think this emotional piece of poetry is quite appropriate today 2nd Nov, All Souls’ Day, a celebration which I thought was similar to All Saints’ Day, 1st Nov.  Apparently in the Roman Catholic Church 1st November commemorates the departure of those who have already been purified and reached heaven, whereas  2nd November celebrates all who have died but are still in the process of “attaining full santification and moral perfection” to get to heaven.

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November 2, 2010 - Posted by | MISCELLANEOUS

2 Comments »

  1. Beautiful Post Elena! And very interesting too. I didn’t even know there was an All Soul’s Day but it makes sense. Moral achievement is hardly attained in this world

    Comment by Cristina | November 9, 2010 | Reply

  2. Thank you Cristina. To tell you the truth, I thought both commemorations were on the same day, 1st November.

    Comment by elenec | November 10, 2010 | Reply


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