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March 20, 2017 Posted by | 1st INT, Speaking, STUDENTS' CORNER, Writing | , , , | Leave a comment

Relative clauses

Here you have a funny definition of the word ‘teacher’. Definitions usually contain relative clauses in English.
teacher funny

“We use relative clauses to give additional information about something without starting another sentence. By combining sentences with a relative clause, your text becomes more fluent and you can avoid repeating certain words.”  (http://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/grammar/relative-clauses)

Example:

The man looks tired.

The man is carrying a heavy suitcase.

We can combine these two sentences into one like this:

The man who is carrying a heavy suitcase looks tired.

Grammar:

More exercises:

Interactive Tutorial

Relative clauses with who, which or that – key

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February 5, 2017 Posted by | 1st INT, GRAMMAR | , | Leave a comment

A short story by Roald Dahl: ‘The Way Up to Heaven’

This is the short story that I asked you to read at Christmas. I hope you enjoyed it. If you haven’t read it yet, you still have the opportunity to do it this weekend. You can download it from the link below:

The Way up to Heaven_INT1º

lift

 

You can also download some the-way-up-to-heaven_activities. We’re going to comment and discuss your answers in class. But if if you can’t come, you can read the answers to the comprehension and vocabulary activities here: key_the-way-up-to-heaven_activities.

Here is a video based on the same story and it is part of a British TV series, Tales of the Unexpected, which ran between 1979 and 1988. Roald Dahl himself introduces the episode and tells the reader how he was inspired to write the story.

January 6, 2017 Posted by | 1st INT, BLOG BOARD, Listening, Reading | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

“Do They Know It’s Christmas?”

Do They Know It’s Christmas?” is the title of a song that Bob Geldof and Midge Ure wrote in 1984 in order to raise money to fight famine in Ethiopia. On 25 November 1984 it was recorded by Band Aid, a group of popular and successful musicians, in the United Kingdom, where it became a fast-selling hit just in a few weeks. Later it was also released outside the UK and reached the tops in thirteen more countries around the world.

The song raised much more money than Geldof himself had hoped, around 8 million pounds, in just 12 months. What’s more, this UK idea led to other charity musical projects and events such as the song “We are the World” by USA for Africa, charity Comic Relief and the Live Aid concert; but above all, it served to make people be aware and financially help alleviate famine in Africa.

“Do they know it’s Christmas?” has been recorded again three more times, in 1989, 2004 and 2014, to provide funds either for famine relief or for the Ebola crisis in west Africa. However, this song hasn’t been the first to be considered as a charity record.

Back in the early seventies, ex-Beatle George Harrison recorded the single “Bangla Desh” to raise money for the 1970 Bhola cyclone and the Bangladesh Liberation War. On 1 August 1971 Harrison and Indian sitar master Ravi Shankar organized The Concert for Bangladesh in New York. That event, which gathered a supergroup of performers, was probably the first benefit concert ever. No only did it raise awareness and big money but it also inspired subsequent charity events and records, such as “Do they know it’s Christmas?”.

Lyrics

It’s Christmas time, and there’s no need to be afraid
At Christmas time, we let in light and banish shade
And in our world of plenty, we can spread a smile of joy

Throw your arms around the world
At Christmas time

But say a prayer and pray for the other ones
At Christmas time, it’s hard but while you’re having fun
There’s a world outside your window, and it’s a world of dread and fear
Where a kiss of love can kill you, and there’s death in every tear
And the Christmas bells that ring there are the clanging chimes of doom

Well tonight we’re reaching out and touching you

Bring peace and joy this Christmas to West Africa
A song of hope they’ll have is being alive
Why is comfort deadly fear
Why is to touch to be scared
How can they know it’s Christmas time at all

Here’s to you
Raise a glass to everyone
Here’s to them
And all their years to come

Can they know it’s Christmas time at all

Feed the world, let them know it’s Christmas time again
Feed the world, let them know it’s Christmas time again
Heal the world, let them know it’s Christmas time again
Feed the world, let them know it’s Christmas time again
Heal the world, let them know it’s Christmas time again
Heal the world, let them know it’s Christmas time again
Feed the world, let them know it’s Christmas time again
Heal the world, let them know it’s Christmas time again
Heal the world

Read more: Band Aid – Do They Know It’s Christmas Lyrics | MetroLyrics

December 18, 2016 Posted by | MUSIC, VIDEOS | , , , | Leave a comment

Your favourite childhood Christmas memories

I’d like you to participate in our school library activity this Christmas season. You just need to follow the instructions on the library blog. Enjoy writing about your dearest memories and share them with us!

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December 7, 2016 Posted by | STUDENTS' CORNER, Writing | , | Leave a comment

Roald Dahl’s Little Red Riding Hood

The poem I asked you to read last week was written by Roald Dahl, a really polific author who was born in 1916. This year we celebrate the 100th anniversary of his birth. You can read about this on the school library blog.

This is his personal version of the traditional fairy tale. You can enjoy it both by listening to him telling the story and by reading it yourselves at the same time. As in many of his writings, there is a twist in the tale at the end.

I’ve thought that you could compare this version to a more traditional one by Perrault on Storynory, a website where you can enjoy reading and listening to 100s of free audio stories. You can also download them for free.

November 21, 2016 Posted by | Listening, Reading | , | Leave a comment

The debate is “blowing in the wind”

Years ago I wrote a short post about Bob Dylan and his popular “Blowing’ in the wind”. I had noticed that quite a number of students had little or no idea who this singer-songwriter was and how much he had influenced music in the sixties and in subsequent years.

bob2

Never had I imagined that he could be presented with the prestigious Nobel Prize in Literature. Nobody, I think, would have dreamed that a singer could be awarded such honour.

Whether we believe Dylan deserves the prize or not, we cannot deny his long-lasting and influential career for over five decades. He has become a legend in music by singing in his low and rough voice about “life’s greatest tragedies”: “war, heartbreak, betrayal, death and moral faithlessness”.

 

 

Bob Dylan, who was born 75 years ago in Duluth, Minnesota, has not really been a man for interviews. He has always been a secretive and elusive person, never inclined to make his life public. Actually, he has said very little about the Swedish Academy’s decision, keeping  his opinion to himself, and oblivious to the intense debate that is taking place.

October 17, 2016 Posted by | Listening, MUSIC | , , | Leave a comment

“The answer, my friend, is blowin’ in the wind”

This is probably one the most popular songs of all times, or at least that’s what I thought before I realised that for many of you, young students, Bob Dylan and his ‘protest’ song belong to my time. In fact, he wrote it in 1962, the same year I was born. Unfortunately nowadays his questions about peace, war or freedom haven’t been responded yet, so the answers are still ‘blowing in the wind’, and I’m afraid  future generations will keep asking the same questions again and again.

Blowin’ in the Wind  –   Bob Dylan

How many roads must a man walk down
before you call him a man?
How many seas must a white dove sail
before she sleeps in the sand?
Yes and how many times must the cannonballs fly
before they’re forever banned?
The answer, my friend, is blowing in the wind;
the answer is blowing in the wind.

Yes and how many years can a mountain exist
before it is washed to the sea?
Yes and how many years can some people exist
before they’re allowed to be free?
Yes and how many times can a man turn his head
and pretend that he just doesn’t see?
The answer, my friend, is blowing in the wind;
the answer is blowing in the wind.

Yes and how many times must a man look up
before he can see the sky?
Yes and how many ears must one man have
before he can hear people cry?
Yes and how many deaths will it take till he
knows
that too many people have died?
The answer, my friend, is blowing in the wind;
the answer is blowing in the wind.

October 16, 2016 Posted by | MUSIC | , | Leave a comment

Exámenes de Septiembre 2016

Consulta aquí las fechas y aula para los exámenes de septiembre.

  • Pruebas escritas (listening/reading/writing):

1º de nivel intermedio: grupos 1ºD, 1ºF, 1ºH, 1ºG y 1ºJ

Jueves, 1 de septiembre a las 16:00 h – Aula 21

  • Pruebas orales:

              1º de nivel intermedio: grupos 1ºD, 1ºF, 1ºH, 1ºG y 1ºJ

              Viernes, 2 de septiembre a partir de las 16:00 h – Aula 21

Consultar la hora correspondiente en el tablón  de Conserjería o a través de la tutora en elenespina@hotmail.com

June 6, 2016 Posted by | 1st INT, BLOG BOARD | , | Leave a comment

Time for a riddle!

According to the dictionary, a riddle is “a puzzling question, problem or matter”. Now you might be wondering what the meaning of puzzling is. Well, it’s similar to confusing. If you like riddles in Spanish, you’ll probably enjoy this in English.

The sites below provide a variety of logic puzzles and riddles:

June 5, 2016 Posted by | VOCABULARY | 3 Comments